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Did a foreign agent control the Foreign Relations Committee?

Did a foreign agent control the Foreign Relations Committee?

A FARA charge against Sen. Menendez follows federal bribery indictments claiming he used his influence to increase US aid and weapons to Egypt.

Analysis | Video Section

What if the chair of the powerful Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the committee that oversees legislation impacting war powers, treaties, troop deployments, and military aid, was illegally acting as a foreign agent of Egypt, one of the biggest recipients of U.S. aid and military sales?

That scenario is exactly what the Department of Justice alleged last month when it accused Sen. Bob Menendez (D—NJ) of using his influence to increase U.S.-taxpayer funded aid to Egypt in exchange for gold bars, a Mercedes and stacks of cash.

The Justice Department and Menendez are making history. This is the first time a sitting U.S. senator has been accused of violating the Foreign Agents Registration Act (or FARA), a law that prohibits Members of Congress from acting as an agent of a foreign principal.

The Justice Department’s FARA investigations into a high profile politician, think tank president and hip hop star sends a clear message that no one is above the law, says a new video by the Quincy Institute’s Senior Video Producer Khody Akhavi and Democratizing Foreign Policy Program Director Ben Freeman.

Did a Foreign Agent Control the Senate's Foreign Relations Committee?
Analysis | Video Section
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Blinken rocks out on a road to nowhere

Europe

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Trump's big idea: Deploy assassination teams to Mexico

North America

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