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Israel's military intel chief calls for reviving Iran nuclear deal

The security establishment is becoming increasingly vocal about the need to prevent the JCPOA from collapsing.

Middle East

The head of Israel’s military intelligence agency, Maj. Gen. Aharon Haliva, has said that the revival of the Iran nuclear agreement would be better for Israel than if it were to be allowed to collapse entirely. 

Haliva reportedly told ministers during a recent Security Cabinet meeting “that a deal in Vienna would serve Israel’s interests by providing increased certainty about the limitations on Iran's nuclear program, and it would buy more time for Israel to prepare for escalation scenarios.” 

The Israeli government under former Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu campaigned vigorously for Donald Trump to pull out of the deal. But now, an increasing number of current and former Israeli security officials are quietly coming out of the woodwork to acknowledge what a disaster that position has been for Israel — particularly now that Iran’s nuclear program has only grown since Trump’s withdrawal in 2018 — and call for the restoration of the JCPOA.

Ministers at the same meeting also agreed that Israel should not publicly attack the Biden administration should a deal to restore the nuclear agreement be reached, with Foreign Minister Yair Lapid reportedly warning “that such public attacks could seriously damage the relationship with the administration.”

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken meets with Israeli Foreign Minister Yair Lapid, in Rome, Italy on June 27, 2021. [State Department Photo by Ron Przysucha]
Middle East
Bibi's push for a long war undermines Israel’s best friend — America
L-R: U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu shake hands after their meeting at the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, on Monday, January 30, 2023. DEBBIE HILL/Pool via REUTERS

Bibi's push for a long war undermines Israel’s best friend — America

Middle East

Israeli military operations in response to the October 7 attack by Hamas have continuously expanded throughout its near abroad in an ever-widening range.

While it is true that Hamas has many diplomatic and logistical connections with other actors such as Hezbollah and Iran, it also seems apparent that the embattled Netanyahu government wants to prolong the war, if not expand it, in a bid to stay in power.

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Congress needs answers before sending more aid to Ukraine

President Joe Biden is seen with Speaker of the House Mike Johnson as he departs from the Friends of Ireland ceremony on the House steps of the Capitol Building in Washington, D.C., on March 15, 2024. (Photo by Aaron Schwartz/NurPhoto)

Congress needs answers before sending more aid to Ukraine

Washington Politics

Many are seeing the current impasse over the future of U.S. aid to Ukraine as the ultimate manifestation of congressional dysfunction. Following several attempts, the Senate in February passed a $95 billion bill that includes most of the Biden administration’s previous requests, minus border funding. That bill sits in limbo in the House, with Speaker Mike Johnson (R-La.) — while signaling he wants a vote on it, has so far been unwilling to bring it to the floor.

Last month House Democrats introduced an arcane “motion to discharge” petition, which could allow supporters to bring the bill to a vote if 218 members agree. While 191 have signed the petition, the odds of finding another 27 appear daunting, given the number of progressive Democrats who oppose military assistance for Israel, and opposition by Republicans to bypassing the Speaker.

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An illegal war with Houthis isn't stopping the Red Sea crisis

RED SEA (Jan. 9, 2024) A MH-60R helicopter lands on the flight deck of guided-missile destroyer USS Laboon (DDG 58) in the Red Sea, Jan. 9, 2024. Laboon is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet Area of operations to help ensure maritime security in the Middle East region. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alice Husted)

An illegal war with Houthis isn't stopping the Red Sea crisis

Middle East

The United States is waging an illegal war in Yemen, where major shipping routes along the country’s coastlines have been disrupted by ongoing violence in the region.

Despite widespread understanding in Washington that U.S. military operations in Yemen violate U.S. law, U.S. officials continue to insist that they must continue their military campaign, which they say is necessary to saving time and money on commercial shipping through the Middle East.

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Israel-Gaza Crisis

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